1. woc-resist:

    tran-twins:

    Film Title: “API Hair & Queerness” by Sally Tran (full version)

    So two summers ago, I independently worked on a short documentary on how hair plays a role within shaping our identities and explore what are the factors that render them.

    Before I began this project, my hair was at the length of my hips. People have told me that during this time, i looked and presented more “straight” and “femme” and that “I was too pretty to be gay.”

    Beauty privilege? Passing privilege? Asian privilege?

    Every time anyone told me, “Oh you look so fucking pretty because of your hair,” i began to believe that my beauty could only exist because of my long silky black hair.

    I felt vulnerable, I felt restricted, i felt conforming. That this piece of hair that was dangling side to side from my scalp is what defined my beauty.

    Within queer spaces, i felt as if there were levels of “queer authenticity” that I had to pass in order to be taken seriously. I felt that I wasn’t “queer enough” because I had long hair, and because i had passing privilege, I felt a lot of femmephobia and the pressure to do this DYKE INITIATION and finally cut my hair which is one of the reasons how this project came about.

    I wanted to document the experience of individuals within the queer and Asian womyn/trans community throughout California and explore how gender presentation plays a big role in shaping our different, unique, and intersectional identities.

    **note this is my first ever film, so theres several glitches in there so be gentle… and i luhh you**

    Enjoy

    reblogging to watch later

  2. camwyn:

    local-shop:

    punch-a-your-buns:

    local-shop:

    ewebean:

    adrnired:

    debbieneedstostrut:

    what is the MAGIC

    it’s called mochi!

    it’s like ice cream in a soft skin!

    also, it’s fucking amazing!

    This is もちアイス (mochiaisu) and the “soft skin” is pounded rice cake. The white stuff you see on the outside is powdered sugar so they won’t get sticky. It’s very delicious on a hot day and you can get these at the right self-serve frozen yogurt joints. Unfortunately North America sells one mochiaisu for a dollar and some cents whereas in Japan you can get these by the boxful in any supermarket.

    Want it. Nnh

    you can make it yourself at home folks! Mochi is really simple to make, all you have to do is take 2 cups rice flower, mix with 1 cup water and 1/2 cup sugar, boil it in a pot or put in a ceranwrap covered bowl and put in microwave for 7 minutes. turn off the heat and stir it until it becomes solid and sticky. Then you can roll it into balls with a little bit of rice flour on top to keep it from being too sticky. Then you can eat it just like that, cover a scoop of ice cream and freeze it to make this, or you can make Strawberry Daifuku which is strawberries and red bean paste (anko) wrapped in mochi. I make it all the time!

    Aww damn i gotta do this!!

    I need to buy rice flour. Like, now.

  3. "There are so many writers of color out there, and often what they get when they bring their books to their editors, they say, ‘We don’t relate to the character.’ Well it’s not for you to relate to! And why can’t you expand yourself so you can relate to the humanity of a character as opposed to the color of what they are?"
    Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair, via this excellent Buzzfeed article on diversity in publishing. (via leeandlow)
  4. revolutionary-mindset:

Omari Grant, 11, of Henry County, Ga., (pictured) said that he was terrified after a police officer pulled a gun on him while he and his friends were building a tree fort in their neighborhood, WSB-TV 2 reports.
Grant, a 5th grade student, says he and his friends often play in the wooded area behind his home, but a neighbor in his subdivision called the cops to complain about their activities. What exactly happened that lead up to the cop allegedly pulling the gun on the boy is not clear, but Grant said he followed the cop’s orders.
“I was thinking that I don’t want to be shot today, so I just listened to what they said,” Grant recalled.
Janice Baptiste, the boy’s mother, filed an excessive force complaint with the department. “So my son was of course traumatized by that,” she said.
A WSB-TV reporter spoke to Edgar Dillard, whose wife, according to 911 records, called the cops to complain about the boys “chopping off tree limbs.” Dillard said he was shocked that a gun was pulled on the child to deal with what he believed as a safety issue.
“There were falling hazards, tripping hazards, all types of hazards, so No. 1 was concern for the children and concern for the environment,” Dillard said.
No arrests were made, but the department is now investigating the officer’s actions.
“If it was justified then we’ll deal with it, if it wasn’t we’ll address it as well,” said Sgt. Joey Smith with the Henry County Police Department.
Grant said maybe he and his friends should not have been in the trees that day, but was still shocked that he needed a gun pointed at him to learn his lesson.

    revolutionary-mindset:

    Omari Grant, 11, of Henry County, Ga., (pictured) said that he was terrified after a police officer pulled a gun on him while he and his friends were building a tree fort in their neighborhood, WSB-TV 2 reports.

    Grant, a 5th grade student, says he and his friends often play in the wooded area behind his home, but a neighbor in his subdivision called the cops to complain about their activities. What exactly happened that lead up to the cop allegedly pulling the gun on the boy is not clear, but Grant said he followed the cop’s orders.

    “I was thinking that I don’t want to be shot today, so I just listened to what they said,” Grant recalled.

    Janice Baptiste, the boy’s mother, filed an excessive force complaint with the department. “So my son was of course traumatized by that,” she said.

    A WSB-TV reporter spoke to Edgar Dillard, whose wife, according to 911 records, called the cops to complain about the boys “chopping off tree limbs.” Dillard said he was shocked that a gun was pulled on the child to deal with what he believed as a safety issue.

    “There were falling hazards, tripping hazards, all types of hazards, so No. 1 was concern for the children and concern for the environment,” Dillard said.

    No arrests were made, but the department is now investigating the officer’s actions.

    “If it was justified then we’ll deal with it, if it wasn’t we’ll address it as well,” said Sgt. Joey Smith with the Henry County Police Department.

    Grant said maybe he and his friends should not have been in the trees that day, but was still shocked that he needed a gun pointed at him to learn his lesson.

  5. ankh-kush:

The only thing better than seeing women who stand up for their rights, is men who stand beside them in solidarity. Add that to a movement of indigenous peasant resistance against the forces of colonialism and global capitalism and you have the Zapatistas, one of the most prolific revolutionary groups to embody the intersectional struggle of a people. 
The blend of anarchism, Marxism, and traditional indigenous beliefs in their ideology makes them that much more volatile and inspirational.
EZLN Women’s Revolutionary Law (1994)

    ankh-kush:

    The only thing better than seeing women who stand up for their rights, is men who stand beside them in solidarity. Add that to a movement of indigenous peasant resistance against the forces of colonialism and global capitalism and you have the Zapatistas, one of the most prolific revolutionary groups to embody the intersectional struggle of a people. 

    The blend of anarchism, Marxism, and traditional indigenous beliefs in their ideology makes them that much more volatile and inspirational.

    EZLN Women’s Revolutionary Law (1994)

  6. "People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive."
    Joseph Campbell
  7. magictransistor:

Diego Rivera. Pre-Hispanic America. Book Cover for Pablo Neruda’s Canto General. 1950. 

    magictransistor:

    Diego Rivera. Pre-Hispanic America. Book Cover for Pablo Neruda’s Canto General. 1950. 

  8. chasertiff:

    When I say “boys are dumb” what I really mean is “boys have been raised in a patriarchal society that forces them into an incorrect and problematic view of masculinity that not only forces them to strip away valuable virtues from themselves, like patience and gentleness, but also forces them them to view and treat women in unhealthy ways that devalues women as people and makes them into objects purely for a man’s benefit”

    but it’s a lot faster to say “boys are dumb”

About me

Xikana mujerista mom and teacher fomenting peaceful and playful revolution.

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